Abortion-by-phone is ‘commerce not care’

Read Abortion-by-phone is ‘commerce not care’

The Anglican Bishop of North Sydney, Chris Edwards, says the proposal that Australian women would be able to access abortions by phone and mail smacks of a program driven by commercial concerns rather than by genuine care for people.

Media reports say an Australian group will offer mothers an over-the-phone assessment before posting them an abortion kit, including the abortion drug RU486 and painkillers.

“Our willingness to treat an unborn person as an anonymous being is now being extended to an expectant mother.” Bishop Edwards said. “No one, other than a voice on the phone, to provide care and no one to assess the psychological damage that may be done by this dehumanised, commercial process."

“While we certainly oppose the termination of unborn lives, this bizarre proposal raises new concerns for their mothers and seems only to provide a low cost tele-marketing opportunity for drug companies.” the Bishop said.
“The decision to terminate a human life, whatever stage of development it has reached, involves an implied judgement that a particular form of life does not deserve ultimate respect.” Bishop Edwards said. “How could we condone this process taking place over the phone?”
“The foetus in a woman’s womb is neither a growth in a host’s body, nor merely a potential human being. It is human life. As a Christian I am committed to the defending the sanctity and promoting the quality of life given by God.”
“I have no desire to stand in personal judgement on any who may have resorted to an abortion. I want to say to them instead, “There is forgiveness with God” (Psalm 130:4). Christ died for our sins and offers us a new beginning.” Bishop Edwards said.



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